Dry Fire Drills

  • The Draw – The goal of this dry fire drill is to improve the speed of your draw along with clearly seeing your front sight on the target. We suggest using the target that you use in competition, requalification, etc. Start off with a warm up period and then start with your drill. You want to start off slower than what you are capable of and then progressively get faster. You should see your front sight clearly on the target when the second beep sounds. All draws slower than and up to your designated Par time should be smooth. If you are not getting the front sight before the second beep, you Par time should be adjusted. You do want to do a set that is faster than what you are capable of doing. This will train you body to know what is faster and eventually this will become your new Par time. With this drill you can leave your finger along the slide, touch the trigger or actually press the trigger. If you press the trigger, keep it smooth. Don’t jerk the trigger to beat the time.
  • Turn and Draw – This is the same as “The Draw” dry fire drill, but you will start with your back to the target. Most feel that it is fastest to turn toward your strong side. Be careful not to draw and then turn, for competition this breaks the 180° rule and you would be disqualified. Get the head around quick to pick up the target. See the front sight on the target and once again trigger work is your choice.
  • Strong Hand Draw – Here you are drawing and pushing out to the target with the strong hand only. Start off with a warm up and progressively work towards your Par time. Once again you must see the front sight clearly on the target. Find your natural point of aim prior to this drill. Close your eyes, raise your arm up and open your eyes and then adjust your feet as needed to line up to the target. During the drill do something with your support hand. I put my support hand across my chest.
  • Support Hand from a 45° angle – Gun starts out of the holster and pointed down at about a 45° angle. Same as with the strong hand drill, you must now do something with your Strong hand. On the buzzer raise the gun up to the target and clearly see the front sight on the target. As before find your natural point of aim for this drill.
  • Support Hand from the Draw – Gun starts in the holster. On the buzzer the gun is drawn with the Strong and transferred to the Support hand and driven out to the target. See the front sight clearly on the target. Quickly switching hands can be tricky. In order to not create bad habits, if you drop the gun, let it fall. Typically what we do in practice is what we will do in real life and catching a loaded firearm can have deadly consequences.
  • El Prez – You will need three targets spaced out appropriately. Start with them close together and then move them farther apart as you get faster. Usually a classifier drill, El Prez starts with your back to the target. On the buzzer, turn and draw, get a sight pictures on each target and reload and get a sight pictures on each target again. Obviously there is no way to simulate recoil here and don’t self induce the recoil. The main goal is to go through the motions. This will improve your transitions. Once again you must see your front sight and then move to the next target.
  • Reloads – Start with the gun out on target. On the buzzer release the magazine and reload and drive the gun back out on target and see your front sight. Keys here are to keep the gun up and don’t drop it down towards the waist. This is all wasted motion and can add a half a second or more to your reloads. You should see you magwell as the magazine is approaching it.
  • Reload on the move – Mark off a particular distance that you want to move. Start with the gun up and on the buzzer start moving and drop the magazine. While moving load another magazine and present it to the target at your designated distance. You will need to experiment with this to find the right distance and time. Keep the distance fairly short, you are measuring you reload, not your ability to run a long distance.
  • Table Draw – Start with the gun on the table. There are multiple variations to this drill. I suggest practicing them all, since you never know what you may run into at a competition. You can be seated or standing for all of these. First variation starts as if the gun is loaded and on the table. Pick the gun up and present it to the target. Second variation starts with the gun on the table and a magazine with “clearly marked” dummy round. On the buzzer, pick up the gun and the magazine, load with the dummy round and present the gun to the target. Other variations might include using a IDPA Box. Remember you must see the front sight by the second beep.
  • Moving Drills – Here we are moving from point A to point B in the shortest amount of time and once again the drill is over once the gun is out on target and we see the front sight. I suggest moving both left and right, forward and backwards, along with a combination of both. Find which way you are slower and improve. As you approach your final spot to present the gun on target, make sure the gun is up chest high or face high (eye high). This will save a lot of time in presenting the gun. Moving drills are great to video tape as are any of the drills. You will spot things you had no idea you were doing.